The Contract Friction Welding Experts

We don’t just build friction welders – we operate them, too. When you partner with our Contract Friction Welding team, we will handle your project from start to finish on our state-of-the-art friction welding machines. Whether you need one part every year or one part every minute, we are here to help you reach your production goals.

 

Comprehensive Weld Development

Can your materials be friction welded? How does your part geometry play a role? Our friction welding experts will tell you! Our weld development process is all about optimizing your friction welds. Once we evaluate your materials and produce sample parts, we will provide you with the specs to either begin joining or to help build a friction welder that’s right for your project.

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Pre and Post-Weld Processes

Our friction welding process starts well before your parts touch our friction welders and long after they come off the machines. From our in-house metallurgical lab to a machine shop equipped to develop custom tooling, we can take your project from concept to completion without needing to tap into outside resources. This efficiency saves time and shipping costs.

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Production Assurance Program

Our contract friction welding group isn’t just for customers who don’t have their own friction welders. Our Production Assurance Program helps bridge the gap if your MTI-built friction welder is undergoing routine maintenance or if you experience higher-than-normal part volumes. Let us keep your tooling warm and handle your overflow on our machines, without any breaks in your production process.

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Bimetallic Joining

From Copper and Aluminum to Steel and Inconel, friction welding allows for the joining of dissimilar metals – and there’s no better place to try out your combination than with our Contract Friction Welding team! Allow us to test your materials for strength and durability, and then learn how your combination could benefit your overall process!

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OUR MACHINES

Your Part on MTI Built Machines

MTI Model 400 Rotary Friction Welder

The only machine of its kind in the world, the Model 400 is designed for big jobs – 450 tons of weld force, to be exact. The unique rotary friction welder mitigates risk and is available for contract friction welding and production use. Featuring a large assortment of tooling, the 400 is ideal for “special” higher force large part applications.

LF35-75 Linear Friction Welder

Featuring the largest tooling envelope of any linear friction welder in the world, the MTI-built LF-35-75 allows for the production of the largest full-scale parts available. This state-of-the-art machine is available now for cutting-edge development work at the LIFT facility in Detroit, Michigan.  Schedule your full-sized part development today.

Low Force Lab Machine - Rotary

MTI’s Low-Force Friction Welding technology uses an external energy source to raise the interface temperature of parts being welded, reducing the process forces required to make a solid-state weld compared to traditional friction welding. Advantages of this cutting-edge rotary process include reduction in machine cost, faster part cycle times and tighter weld tolerances.

Dual Headed Friction Stir Welder

From railcar components to decking for ships and aircrafts, MTI’s friction stir welder is one of the longest of its kind in the world. The dual-head capability allows for simultaneous top and bottom welds of up to 55-feet long. Even longer welds can be achieved with modifications.

Model 250 Rotary Friction Welder

One of MTI’s more adaptable machines, the Model 250 has played a role in some key aerospace advancements of the 21st century. The machine successfully joined copper to titanium for an essential NASA component that measures the earth’s temperature using thermal infrared sensors (TIRS.)

Low Force Lab Machine - Linear

MTI’s Low-Force Friction Welding technology uses an external energy source to raise the interface temperature of parts being welded, reducing the process forces required to make a solid-state weld compared to traditional friction welding. Advantages of this cutting-edge linear process include reduction in machine cost, faster part cycle times and tighter weld tolerances.