Low Force Friction Welding

The use of an external energy source to raise the interface temperature of the parts being welded, reducing the process forces required to make a solid-state weld compared to traditional friction welding.

 

Advantages and Benefits
  • Reduction in machine COST
  • Faster part cycle times
  • Reduction in machine size
  • Lower process force
  • Tighter welded tolerances
  • Less material consumption during welding
  • Better part fatigue performance
  • Perfect angular alignment (orientation)
  • Lower residual stresses
  • Provides pre- and post-weld thermal treatment possibilities
  • Improved flash geometry
  • Reduction in required machine forces
  • Flash size reduced with reduction in burn off, geometry no longer has sharp raisers
  • HAZ characteristics can be manipulated to produce geometry more similar to a resistance (Flash Butt weld), but with the benefits of bi-directional strain from a solid-state weld
  • Ability to weld thin wall thicknesses, including sheet metal

Process Overview

Friction Welding is more of a forging process than an actual welding process. Low-Force Friction Welding can be applied to both Linear or Rotary Friction welded parts.

  • 1The components are clamped rigidly in perfect orientation and alignment.
  • 2The components are brought into contact and the preheating phase begins.
  • 3Once the weld interface has reached the desired condition the solid-state bond process begins.
  • 4Once a predetermined displacement is achieved, the relative motion ceases and the weld is complete.
  • 5The result is a high-integrity joint with customizable characteristics and 100 percent cross sectional bond of forged quality.
  • 6The preheating phase can be continued throughout and past the solid-state bonding sequence to provide in-process heat treatment or post heating.

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